Van Gaal: Villa draw could cost us

first_img It left van Gaal’s side third in the Barclays Premier League, seven points behind leaders Chelsea, and the boss felt draws at places like Villa Park would rule his side out of the title race. “Yes, that’s what I mean,” he said. “We dropped two points. We were the better team and that’s frustrating when you’re the better team and you don’t win these kind of games. When you want to be a part of the title race you have to win these games. “I have seen Manchester City in the first half against Crystal Palace and they could have been behind in the first five or 10 minutes. They struggled until half time but at the end it is 3-0, that’s the difference. “We weren’t so aggressive in the first half as we are usually. We kept the ball much better but didn’t create so much because we were not looking for the forwards. “It was not good enough to catch the victory here. “We were not creative enough in the second half but we had more aggression so that was the plus. “We have a draw and that’s why I’m a little frustrated because you could have won the game in my opinion. We didn’t do it but we were responsible for that.” Radamel Falcao cancelled out Christian Benteke’s opener but United’s six-game winning run ended with a 1-1 draw. Gabby Agbonlahor was harshly sent off for Villa with 25 minutes left but the visitors could not break down their organised hosts. Louis van Gaal admits Manchester United’s draw at Aston Villa could end up costing them the title. Falcao scored just his second goal for United, heading in Ashley Young’s second-half cross, and van Gaal was pleased with his impact. “It was a beautiful goal, I liked him today. I am very happy for him and I am always happy when Manchester United score,” he said. “I have to compare players every week, there’s always a question for every player, not only for Falcao.” Villa held firm despite Agbonlahor’s red card and boss Paul Lambert was left baffled why he was dismissed by referee Lee Mason after what looked like just collision with Young. “If that’s a red card you might as well pack up because it won’t be a game of football. I spoke to Brad Guzan after the game and he said Ashley Young admitted he felled Gabby, so work that one out,” said Lambert who will look at appealing. “That’s not a red card, I will stick up for him all day long. It’s a tackle where two lads have gone in for the ball. “He is not going to spring up and say ‘don’t send him off’, it would be a first in world football. Man Utd want to win the game and we want to.” But Lambert was full of praise for his side, missing the suspended Kieran Richardson and Alan Hutton with Ashley Westwood injured and United loanee Tom Cleverley ineligible, after the point left them 12th. He said: “I thought we were excellent considering everything has gone against us this week, injuries suspensions and ineligibility. Look at our bench, it was a kindergarten. The performance was absolutely terrific. “Christian scored a world class goal and gives you something to hold onto.” Press Associationlast_img read more

Ah, Shucks!

first_imgBy John BurtonKids volunteer at FH Firemen’s Fair for a ticket to rideJoe Perrotto (right), who oversees these fair volunteers, with his recruits.FAIR HAVEN – Getting up early on a hot and humid late August morning to shuck corn may not be everybody’s idea of fun.  But for the kids volunteering their corn-husking talents for the Fair Haven Firemen’s Fair, it seemed like a lot of fun – and there was a payoff for their labor.“My mom said you can work at the fair and get free (ride and meal) tickets,” 13-year-old Cameron Reed said.“It sounded pretty cool, so I decided to come do it,” offered Jake Robinson, Cameron’s cousin, also 13, who was visiting from Somerset.Cameron and Jake were two of about 10 kids on hand standing over trash cans on Tuesday, Aug. 28. They were pulling ears of corn out of tall sacks and stripping them of their husks and silk so they could be cooked later that day when the crowds arrived at the fire company property at 645 River Road.“I’ve been doing this since, like, third grade,” Cameron said. “It’s not that bad.”This is the second year that borough residents T.J. Sullivan and James Foley, both 12, have offered their help, which includes doing some chores in addition to corn duty, for the annual fair.“I like it,” T.J. said, with James nodding in agreement.They have been attending the fair – which opened Aug. 24 and closes Sept. 1 – most of the evenings, so, they said, it seemed appropriate that they offered their help. It was a decision supported by their parents.The boys also liked the idea of getting those extra tickets.  James said he could get either two free rides and a meal or two meals and a ride with the tickets earned volunteering. He decided he would go for the two rides, probably The Zipper.“Definitely, The Zipper,” jumped in 10-year-old Lily Barnett. “It’s so spinney and fast.”Lily was less enthusiastic about spending her morning shucking corn and doing other chores. “But it’s worth it when I get tickets,” she said.“I like the rides and the boardwalk games,” said William Francis, 9, who was working alongside Jake and Michael Jakub, two brothers who are 11 and 9, respectively. But for William there was another draw beyond the rides and fun at the fair that the other kids all noted as well.  “You get to see your friends here,” he said.“It’s a good way to meet up with friends you haven’t seen over the summer,” T.J. agreed.People who were away for much of the summer, James said, seem to make it a point to return for this end of the season tradition. “Pretty much all of Fair Haven goes.”James also saw another benefit to his volunteering at 8 a.m. “Now, at least when you go back to school,” he said, “it’s not so bad getting up in the morning.”Joe Perrotto, a 20-year veteran of the fire company who was on hand to oversee the kids and their work, is responsible for purchasing and morning organization for the fair. Traditionally, he said, he gets 15 to 30 kids each year to participate and over the years he’s seen many return year after year.“You watch them grow up and the next thing you know, they’re riding the fire truck,” as fire company members, he said. “This is their way to give back.”“Without these kids, we couldn’t do what we do,” he said. “They do the chores to get us going.”It’s not all fun and games either, he admitted. “One of the things with these kids here is they have to put up with me for eight days.”last_img read more

Crematorium Proposal Returns To Middletown

first_img“We have maps and data that support that smoke from this size stack will travel for six miles. If accurate, you’re not talking about a local issue. This covers a large part of northern Monmouth County. You’re talking north to Hazlet and Holmdel; west to Marlboro and south to Red Bank and Little Silver. This is not just a couple of neighborhoods in Middletown that should be worried,” added Clark, who recently launched an online petition denouncing the crematorium. The petition currently has more than 4,000 signatures. Rather than a location set behind the cemetery’s mausoleums, which are visible to drivers traveling the state roadway, the developers have eyed a vacant, forested area on the other side of the railroad tracks identified on the municipal tax map as Block 865, Lot 136. According to New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) press officer Lawrence Hajna, Fair View Cemetery applied for an air pollution control pre-construction permit three years before submitting its application to the township in 2017. Unlike the original site among the cemetery’s thousands of headstones, which includes vital infrastructure like roadways, parking areas and utilities, this 19.5-acre plot is completely undeveloped and, if approved, would place the crematorium directly across Oak Hill Road from the entrance to the Poricy Park Nature Center and a residential development accessible via Ivy Hill Road. It would also be adjacent to Fairview Fields, a series of soccer fields used by township athletes. Currently there are no regulating measures on the books in Middletown pertaining to crematoriums. Mackiewicz said when the application first came before the planning board, she questioned a developer’s professional about the chamber emissions and was troubled to hear the response. “They told me the only thing that comes out of the chamber is water vapor. But that’s a vague statement. After questioning them about the vapor, they said it would not be 100 percent clean. They said it’s the same effect as if I was running my own fireplace. But I’m not putting bodies in my fire place. There’s other things in a body we need to worry about,” Mackiewicz told The Two River Times. Clark also noted there is mercury present in some deceased bodies, mostly derived from silver dental fillings, that is most dangerous to pregnant women and small children. Though crematoriums are considered low emitters of potentially hazardous materials, a group of township residents are not so sure. QUESTIONINGEMISSIONS According to the New Jersey Cemetery Association there are an estimated 25 operational crematoriums in the state, and around the country they are being viewed as a viable option for cemeteries that are running out of plots. A crematorium is a permitted use at Fair View Cemetery, one of the largest nonsectarian cemeteries in the Garden State. Two years ago the application was granted conditional approval by the Middletown Planning Board. The DEP approved thatpermit June 19, 2014, andthe permit is due to expireJune 18, 2019, Hajna toldThe Two River Times. Regina Mackiewicz said she began monitoring the situation in April 2017, and is the founder of the Facebook group Stop Fairview Crematorium, a private group that has nearly 550 members. Fair View Cemetery, a 90-acre parcel bordering Route 35 South, Oak Hill Road and the NJ Transit North Jersey Coast Line railway, initially proposed the construction of a crematorium in April 2017. However, the site of theproject will be moved.center_img Clark, who was an active member of the Residents Against Giant Electric (RAGE) group, which was instrumental in defeating a $111 million power line proposal by JCP&L, said a new resident opposition group is growing in the township and is collecting data that shows the potential dangers which could arise from the crematorium chambers. The scope of the project is expected to remain the same when Fair View Cemetery goes back to the planning board March 20. A NEW LOCATION Despite several attempts, Fair View Cemetery superintendent William Rockafellow could not be reached for comment. “For me, it’s the environmental impact and it’s the toxins that are most troubling. The smoke stacks are said to be low emitters, but there are still hazardous materials like mercury we need to worry about,” said Andrew Clark during a Feb. 25 interview with The Two River Times. Mackiewicz noted that some bodies can contain medical implants, silicone implants and even unaccounted-for pacemakers. “If pacemakers aren’t removed at the funeral home, who is to say they’ll be removed by the crematorium operators? It could be overlooked, and pacemakers do explode inside crematorium chambers, damaging the chambers and filtration systems, which could lead to bigger problems.” But when the developer, Fair View Cemetery Association, sought a setback variance a few months later, which would have allowed them to build the facility just 50 feet away from the nearby highway, the application was snuffed out with a unanimous vote at the July 24, 2017 zoning board meeting. According to the projectdescription delivered to thezoning board in September2016, the project called fora 1,128-square-foot humancrematorium facility withtwo chambers. Because the application is open before the planning board, Middletown Township personnel and elected officials declined comment. RESIDENTS RALLYIN OPPOSITION MIDDLETOWN – After lying dormant, an application for a proposed crematorium is scheduled to go back before the township planning board in March. Crematoriums have been a controversial topic in the area in recent years, including a 2014 case in Oceanport in which elected officials said they would mount a legal defense against Woodbine Cemetery. Though Woodbine proposed a crematorium, it could not obtain an air pollution permit from the DEP. In 2016, a group of Manalapan residents entered a similar fight against a proposed crematorium at the Old Tennent Cemetery. The planning board ultimately refused to hear the application.last_img read more

Former Man United coach Queiroz agrees new Iran deal

first_img1 Former Manchester United coach Carlos Queiroz Former Manchester United coach Carlos Queiroz has penned a new four-year deal as the boss of Iran.The Portuguese – credited with nurturing the talents of compatriot Cristiano Ronaldo at Old Trafford – enjoyed an impressive World Cup although his side finished bottom of a tough Group F which included Argentina, Bosnia and Nigeria.On the back of the summer tournament, the 61-year-old has earned himself a new deal with the national side and the former Real Madrid manager has also secured himself a pay rise.“It ‘s important, but not much higher than the previous one,” said the president of the Iranian Football Federation, Ali Kaffashian, about  Queiroz’s pay hike.last_img