Singaporean to sell half of City’s £200m Lion Plaza

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Moyes: No point risking Rooney

first_img The 27-year-old England striker was sent home from the club’s pre-season tour just 16 hours after landing in Thailand due to a grade one hamstring tear and will now have treatment at United’s training ground as he prepares for the upcoming campain. Moyes has revealed that Rooney first felt his hamstring in training before leaving for Asia and, following tests upon landing, it was decided not to take any risks. But when asked whether he would be ready for the new season, Moyes told MUTV: “Yeah, he’ll be okay. Manager David Moyes has revealed that Manchester United are taking a safety-first approach with Wayne Rooney but is confident the striker will be ready for the start of the new season. “We finished training and we just thought it looked as if he just tightened up a little bit. He was happy with it but when we came out we thought we better just take no chances and just double check it. “He didn’t train yesterday so we thought it would be worth seeing what it was and it was just a very, very slight mark on his hamstring. We won’t take any chances, there is no point in us risking him so we’ve sent him back and he’ll get treatment.” He added: “It’s disappointing. The day we left he just felt his hamstring tighten up right at the end of training and we felt there would be no problem. But after the long flight we decided we’d get him tested and scanned and there is just a small grade one injury there. So there is no point is us taking him another halfway round the world so we’ve sent him back.” Rooney revealed on Thursday he was ‘gutted’ to be leaving the tour but shared his manager’s opinion that the injury is unlikely to keep him out of the start of the new season. “Gutted to have picked up a niggling injury especially as training was going so well, heading back to Manchester to have it assessed fully but early indications are nothing to worry about,” he said on his Facebook page as he headed for the airport. The hamstring problem means Rooney will miss the trips to Australia, Japan and Hong Kong, in addition to United’s tour opener against Singha All Stars in Bangkok on Saturday. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Qatar accused of sabotaging World Cup 2022 rivals with secret campaign

first_img Best clips, calls and talkSPORT moments of 2019, feat Hearn, McCoist and more Tottenham predicted XI to face Brighton with Mourinho expected to make big changes How Chelsea could line up against Southampton – what system will Lampard play? Lord Triesman, former chairman of the Football Association and England bid chairman, urged FIFA to “look at the evidence thoroughly”, and said Qatar should not be allowed to “hold on to the World Cup” if they were shown to have broken FIFA rules.He told the paper: “I think it would not be wrong for FIFA to reconsider England in those circumstances … We have the capabilities.”The Qatar bid team has previously been accused of corruption, but was cleared following a two-year inquiry by the FIFA ethics committee.In a statement, Qatar’s Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy said: “The Supreme Committee rejects each and every allegation put forward by the Sunday Times.“We have been thoroughly investigated and have been forthcoming with all information related to our bid, including the official investigation led by US attorney Michael Garcia.“We have strictly adhered to all FIFA’s rules and regulations for the 2018/2022 World Cup bidding process.”FIFA said an investigation into the circumstances of the bid had already been carried out and no wrongdoing was found.A FIFA spokesperson said: “Concerning the 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup bidding process, a thorough investigation was conducted by Michael Garcia and his conclusions are available in the report, which has been published on FIFA.com.”“Generally speaking, complaints regarding potential breaches of the FIFA Code of Ethics may be filed via FIFA’s confidential reporting mechanism.” 2 Tottenham v Brighton LIVE: talkSPORT commentary and team news for Boxing Day opener How Man United could line up for Newcastle clash – will Pogba start? The Qatar 2022 World Cup bid team broke FIFA rules by running a secret campaign to sabotage their rivals for the tournament, The Sunday Times has claimed.The newspaper says it has been passed documents by a whistleblower who worked with the Qatar bid. NEW ERA How Arsenal could line up in Arteta’s first official game in charge – Ozil return? Every current Premier League club’s best kit from the past decade Qatar will host the World Cup in 2022 smart causal center_img ALTERED who plays? 2 gameday LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS possible xi How the Premier League table could change after the Boxing Day fixtures It says the bid team used a PR agency and former CIA operatives to disseminate fake propaganda about its main competitors, the United States and Australia.This allegedly involved recruiting prominent figures to criticise the bids in their own countries, thus giving the impression they lacked support at home.FIFA rules say that bidders must “refrain from making any written or oral statements of any kind, whether adverse or otherwise, about the bids or candidatures of any other member association which has expressed an interest in hosting and staging the competitions”.Qatar’s Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy said it “rejected” all the claims made by the paper.According to The Sunday Times, the alleged smear campaign included paying a professor 9,000 dollars (£6,900) to write a damning report on the economic cost of a US World Cup, recruiting journalists and bloggers to promote negative stories in the US, Australian and international media, and organising grassroots protests at rugby matches in Australia.The leaked documents also revealed that a group of American PE teachers had been recruited to ask congressmen to oppose a US World Cup on the grounds the money would be better spent on high school sports, the paper claimed. There is much controversy surrounding the Qatar World Cup possible standings highlights last_img read more

ScienceShot: Almost Certain Chance of Catching Next Supernova

first_imgThe last star to go supernova in the Milky Way—that astronomers know of—exploded in 1604, before Galileo first turned a telescope to the heavens. But with a neutrino detector now being built within a Japanese mountain that could come online as early as 2016, researchers might be able to do something as yet undone: Make detailed observations of a supernova in our galaxy before it visibly explodes. First, astronomers would be alerted to the unfolding event by the flood of neutrinos generated when a supernova collapses. Within minutes, they could determine the general area of the sky where the explosion would occur, point their infrared telescopes in that direction, and wait for the fireworks. (Outer portions of a supernova aren’t disrupted until anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours after the core collapse and neutrino burst occur, the researchers note.) An exploding star known as Tycho’s supernova (image) brightened the Milky Way in 1572. With the new sensor in place, instruments—especially infrared telescopes—would have an almost 100% chance of observing the next supernova in our galaxy, the researchers report in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. But because the Milky Way contains a lot of dust, which effectively blocks visible light, the chances of anyone seeing that explosion in the nighttime sky are 20% or less, the researchers note. Odds are somewhat higher for people in the Southern Hemisphere, though, because many more of the galaxy’s stars are visible from there. At current estimated rates of supernova formation in the Milky Way, the odds of one popping off in the next 50 years could be as high as 90%.See more ScienceShots.*Correction, 1 November, 11:19 a.m.: This article has been revised to more accurately reflect the probabilities of a supernova occurring in the next 50 years.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more